The Latest News on Brain Training and Dementia

At the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference on July 24, 2016, the new results of landmark study were presented. This study, called the ACTIVE trial, showed that one particular type of brain exercise—called “speed training” in the study—cut the long-term risk of dementia nearly in half. Previously, the ACTIVE study had shown many other cognitive benefits of speed training, including improved cognitive function, better health and mood, more self-confidence, and fewer car crashes. This is the first time that any intervention—brain-training program, physical exercise, diet/nutrition, or drug—has been shown to reduce the risk of dementia.

For more detail, see the FAQ.

 

What Is Speed Training?

Speed training is an online cognitive training exercise that increases visual processing speed. It was originally developed by Dr. Karlene Ball and Dr. Daniel Roenker. Now, it is exclusively available as the exercise “Double Decision” in BrainHQ.

 

Double Decision is designed to improve the speed and accuracy with which the brain can process visual information, both at the center of gaze and on the periphery. You can watch a short video below showing Double Decision.

 

 

 

What Is BrainHQ?

BrainHQ is an online brain-training system built by Posit Science. The program is available in Canada in English and French by Posit Science exclusive partner, DynamicBrain based in Ottawa, Ontario. DynamicBrain also provides the French version of the program to French-speaking countries globally. The program features 29 exercises that work out attention, memory, brain speed, intelligence, navigation, and people skills. Double Decision—the updated version of the speed training used in ACTIVE—is one of them. Various exercises in BrainHQ are proven in labs and in lives to bring real benefits to brain health and fitness. More than 100 papers have been published in scientific journals, such as the Journal of the American Medical Association, on the BrainHQ exercises and assessments.